Difference between revisions of Measurement

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m (→‎cm Measurement: make everything into steps!)
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** [https://endmyopia.org/another-diy-diopter-measuring-tool/ Making the physical measurement easier]
 
** [https://endmyopia.org/another-diy-diopter-measuring-tool/ Making the physical measurement easier]
 
*[[Varakari's Vision Log Tool]]
 
*[[Varakari's Vision Log Tool]]
* [https://endmyopia.org/focal-calculator/calc.html EndMyopia cm calculator]
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* [[EndMyopia cm calculator]]
 
* [https://endmyopia.org/measure/ Measurement]
 
* [https://endmyopia.org/measure/ Measurement]
 
* [https://testflight.apple.com/join/wuAvRvdL The iOS Sight Meter App]
 
* [https://testflight.apple.com/join/wuAvRvdL The iOS Sight Meter App]

Revision as of 13:08, 17 October 2020


cm Measurement

The cm measurement uses a basic optics formula to calculate the diopters of correction you need to see clearly long distance.

  1. Hold a ruler up to your eye, and measure how far away you can still read text without blur in centimeters. This is your "cm measurement".
    • The ideal precise measurement is from the surface of your eyeball, but this is obviously not safe, so measure from some facial structure near your eye.
    • Consistency is more important than accuracy, you want to be able to track your small changes over the course of a day, and larger changes over time.
  2. Calculate diopters from the measurement: Diopters = -100cm/cm measurement.
  3. If your result is stronger than -4D, and you wear glasses, you'll need to correct for vertex distance to convert this from contacts diopters to glasses diopters.
  4. If your result is stronger than -10, you'll likely have problems getting consistent readings.

Trial Refraction

If your vision is worse than -10D, you may need a trial lens kit to measure your own myopia, or you may just stick to professional optometrist exams.

Tools

References